Residential ArchitectureHousesGlass And Concrete Pool House by Lieven Dejaeghere

Glass And Concrete Pool House by Lieven Dejaeghere

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (1)

Lieven Dejaeghere architect has designed a concrete and glass pool house, a pavilion connected to a rural residence.

Description by Lieven Dejaeghere: The house is situated in Wannegem-Lede, Belgium, a very nice and cosy village at the entrance of the Flemish Ardennes, the scenery of the Tour of Flanders-cycling race. Its concerns an annex to an existing permanent residence, that serves a pool house, bar, home cinema and summer living room at the same time.

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (4)

This project consisted in creating a pool house design that embraces the rural environment and furthermore includes the existing house from 1998 in its entirety. The pavilion, which was connected to the residence by using a glass footbridge, is completely enveloped in glass. The roof, in exposed concrete, contrasts with the fragility of the glass. The roof was cast on site with the aid of sight formwork and it is supported by steel fins.

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (10)

The transparent extension restructures the existing house and defines an inner area with the quality and characteristics of a farmstead and focuses on the garden, as well as the inner area and the surrounding landscape. The residence to expand has a specific architecture with a saddle roof. The extension separates itself as much as possible from the existing volume, and contrasts in simplicity and light structure.

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (11)

The pool was already there. The transparent extension restructures the existing house and defines an inner area with the quality and characteristics of a farmstead and focuses on the garden, as well as the inner area and the surrounding landscape. The concrete roofing sheet was in situ disposed by using formwork. It is supported by steel fins. To achieve the required insulation values, the concrete awning is thermal unlinked.

Glass And Concrete PoolHouse In Belgium (6)

The awning is anchored in the roofing sheet wit the aid of an insulated connection. The roof is insulated at her top. Likewise for thermal reasons the floor plate is deduplicated. The full height sliding doors have been manufactured thanks to a minimal window frame system of only 20 mm wide, with sliding pieces rolling on multiple small bearings. On top of that, the whole construction remains thermically very high performing.

Architect: Lieven Dejaeghere
Photographs: Tim Van de Velde

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (9)

Glass And Concrete PoolHouse In Belgium (9)

Glass And Concrete PoolHouse In Belgium (10)

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (17)

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (18)

Glass And Concrete PoolHouse In Belgium (11)

Glass And Concrete PoolHouse In Belgium (12)

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (2)

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (3)

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (12)

Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium (19)

Glass And Concrete PoolHouse In Belgium (7)

Glass And Concrete PoolHouse In Belgium (5)

Sea Side Villa by Stella Adrimi & Partners

The Sea Side Villa is situated in the most beautiful seaside plot, in the district of Palio, outside the city of Kavala, in northern Greece. The energy signature of the villa is A+ and it has been constructed in accordance with the strictest principles of biotechnology, to minimise energy consumption.

The Penthouse of the OPUS ONE

T.K. Chu Design was involved in the design of a penthouse located on the 34th floor. With an area of 430 square meters, the penthouse represents the highest living standard for the complex

Sustainable Mountain House in Western Montana

Completed as a collaboration between Studio Zerbey Architecture and Balance Associates Architects, the home was built by McMahon Construction. The natural modern home is sited carefully on a property that has a creek running through its backyard.

San Francisco Home With a Minimalist White Interior and a Generous Vertical Space

For this four-story family residence, the architects experimented with vertical circulation and crisp white materiality to create a spacious, vibrant, and geometrically engaging house. Organized around a singular central spine, the project is an exploration of fluid continuity and volumetric adventure.

Samara Restaurant by Mutuus Studio Showcases the Craft of Food and Design

The restaurant takes its name, Samara, from the winged fruit of maple trees that twirls like a helicopter. That attention to nature find its counterpart in the design of the restaurant. Inside, rich earth tones dominate, bringing to mind a tranquil wooded understory.

Related Articles