Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium

Architects: Steven Vandenborre
Project: Glass And Concrete Pool House
Architect in Charge: Steven Vandenborre
Location: Bruges, Belgium
Area: 101.0 m2
Photography: Tim Van de Velde

Description by architect: The project brings together a walled courtyard and a swimming pool. The living area is a glass box contained within a concrete garden pavilion. By making the poolhouse entirely out of glass, with minimal framed windows, both inside and outside seems to disappear. Natural light is entering the pavilion by creating enclosed gardens.

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 1

The overall atmosphere is a combination of rough and soft materials creating an intense, silent luxury the length of the pool allows you to experience swimming in a garden, under a building and in a building. The garden (designed by Alderik Heirman) is gently entering the building and results in a perfect marriage of nature and architecture.

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 2

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 3

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 4

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 5

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 6

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 7

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 8

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 9

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 10

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 11

Steven Vandenborre Designs a Glass And Concrete Pool House In Belgium 12

Must Read

Field Office Architecture Completed an Open-Plan Addition to a Heritage Home

Field Office Architecture Completed an Open-Plan Addition to a Heritage Home

Sitting at the end of a row of similar late 19th century terraces, the site for this project was fortunate enough to sit on a block that had double-width proportions to the back due to a small electrical substation next door.