FFWD Arquitectes Turned an Old Carpentry Workshop in Industrial Loft

Old Carpentry Workshop Industrial Loft 20

Spanish architectural studio FFWD Arquitectes has transformed an old carpentry workshop in a small living space attached to a house.

From the architect: When dealing with the refurbishment of this old carpenter’s workshop placed at Barcelona’s Poble Sec neighbourhood, the main goal was to set up this space for inhabitation while the main constructive components were mantained. They gave charm and singularity to the space.

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 1

These elements were poorly conserved. Brick and stone walls were hidden under thick linings of gypsum and mortar, as well as the ceiling surface was. Wodden beams in the ceiling were vastly damaged by termites at points, and it could affect the whole building stability.

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 2

However, the property had multiple light openings. The existance of an inner patio allowed us to use translucent glass in the street windows to keep the house privacy. The main spaces of the house will be visually connected with the courtyard which will be their focus point.

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 3

The existing valuable components which we wanted to restore formed the upper shell of the project: walls and roof. Owing to that the floor would be the new constructed element in charge of the space configuration. It becomes a magma that fills the whole base of the space. It creates open areas that are organized with the levels and objects generated.

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 4

First of all, it solves the conflict produced by the two entrances at different heights. It also gives a solution for the relation between the main level and the patio level which is depressed by 45cm. In second place, some of the fixed furniture of the house is raised from the floor. The living-room sofa, the kitchen tables and some of the bathroom sinks are brick-made, and covered with a concrete lining as the floor is.

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 5

In some of the main areas generated, space is organized with the use of closed boxes. They contain the more private uses of the house, such as bathrooms and dressing rooms. With its positioning, bedroom spaces are also generated, remaining separated from the daytime areas of the house.

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 6

The layout singularity arises from the owner requirements. He wanted to have a small independent apartment for the frequent visitors he will have during the year. At the same time, this space will be used as his studio while no guests are in the house. That is the reason why house is conceived with two separated spaces that can be used independently if wanted.

Architects: FFWD Arquitectes
Project: The conversion of a carpentry workshop
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Photography: David Benito Cortázar

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 7

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 8

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 9

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 10

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 12

Old Carpentry Workshop Industrial Loft 19

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 13

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 14

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 15

Old Carpentry Workshop Industrial Loft 18

Old Carpentry Workshop Industrial Loft (17)

Old Carpentry Workshop / Industrial Loft 16

Thank you for reading this article!

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.

Ware Koa House / Strachan Group Architects

Ware Koa House is a former holiday home recently renovated by Strachan Group Architects, a multiple award-winning Auckland practice. Opahi Bay has been the McGreal family holiday destination since the early 1950’s

A Hillside Family House Adds an Earthy Twist to Village Residence Construction

The site is situated at the edge of the village, adjacent to a forest park. Backed by the mountain, endowed with greenery, its peace and quietness inspired the designer Jin Feng, and the silhouette of a reclusive white hillside family house appeared in his mind.

Cole Valley Hillside Home in San Francisco / John Maniscalco Architecture

This Cole Valley hillside home spans four stories and almost 6,000 sq. ft.—from an entertainment level with acclimated walnut wine room, to the open living spaces on the main floor, to the family’s private quarters, to the walk-out rooftop deck.