Residential ArchitectureApartmentsUrban Condo Full Renovation / KUBE Architecture

Urban Condo Full Renovation / KUBE Architecture

Urban Condo Full Renovation / KUBE Architecture

Project: Urban Condo
Architects: KUBE Architecture
Team: Janet Bloomber, Principal / Richard Loosle-Ortega, Principal
Location: Washington, DC
Year 2018
Photography provided by KUBE

This new kitchen in Washington DC was the culmination of a multi-phase full renovation of an urban condo, which spanned a two-year period. The main goal was to integrate the kitchen with the rest of the renovated living space. Towards this end, the surrounding non-structural piers were removed and a dropped ceiling demolished, so that all areas blend together seamlessly as one unified space.

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The kitchen is a focal point from the main entrance of the unit, and the island serves as an important mediating element between entry and living room in this open design.

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The design consists of three key design gestures:
1- LAYERING : A limited palette of materials are used in different spatial planes so they operate as a series of distinct layers. The dark stained ash, cherry wood and aluminum surrounding the fireplace are replicated on the kitchen island and rear cabinetry. The island acts as a furniture piece, visually connecting kitchen to living area.

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2- FRAMING : A wood-slatted “trellis” runs the length of the island, just below the ceiling, and continues down the wall. This frame element provides lighting for the island, while also creating a threshold within the kitchen. The existing copper water pipes were left exposed as a complement to the frame, connecting the island to the wood trellis above – a utilitarian element now celebrated as a unique feature in the space.

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3- FOLDING The condominium’s bamboo flooring was duplicated on the side wall of the kitchen, appearing to fold up and further connect kitchen to living area. This wall also conceals doors to the walk-in pantry and Powder Room, contributing to the minimal look of the condominium overall.

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Energy-efficient LED lighting is used throughout the space as “lines of light” either floating as objects, or highlighting key defining elements. The glossy white upper cabinetry, glass backsplash and quartz countertops are reflective surfaces that provide a luminous backdrop to the composition.

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