Residential ArchitectureRenovation ProjectsMAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home

Architects: MAKE Architecture
Project: Amado House
Location: Essendon, Victoria, Australia
Photography: Peter Bennetts

Amado are external sliding timber screens used on Japanese traditional houses to protect the inner layers of shoji screens from the weather. The Amado House adapts sliding screens to address Australian conditions, moderating harsh sun and discouraging blowflies with flywire replacing rice paper.

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 1

An Essendon period house is refurbished and contrasted with a new backyard pavilion with its own formalistic expression. Qualities of spaciousness, transparency and sunny outlook are embraced, but with their less desirable traits brought under temporal control with a range of devices.

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 2

The pavilion has the big, lofty roof form and internal spatial dimensions of a utilitarian building. This height is balanced by drawing the roof sheeting down the walls like a lowered brow, with a light-taming switch to perforated material performing the visual trick of giving solid mass externally and a glowing veil of translucency within. This duality neatly reverses itself at night, another reading of spatial transparency.

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 4

Sliding amado screens form an outer skin highly adaptive to daily circumstances. The screens stand forward from an openable glass line, forming a space between that blurs the inside/outside distinction and offers many options for sitting, strolling the perimeter, and occupying the garden edge. The space, traditionally the engawa or Japanese verandah of vernacular houses, brings great subtlety in the variety of ways opening glass and opening screens can work together to adapt to the unfolding weather.

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 5

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 6

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 6

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 7

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 8

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 9

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 10

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 11

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 12

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 13

MAKE Architecture Adapted Japanese Sliding Timber Screens to Renovate an Australian Home 14

Subscribe to our newsletter

Coopworth House by FMD Architects

Nestled in the rural surrounds of Bruny Island, Tasmania, Coopworth House is a contemporary interpretation of a country farmhouse. The site’s resident Coopworth sheep, the wide-ranging views to the water and mountain ranges beyond

Seattle Artist House Features a Simple, Elegant and Low-Ego Design

Designed for an artist and an engineer, the Artist house is located mid-block in a downtown neighborhood surrounded by common Seattle cottages and bungalows. The owners have listed several additional criteria for their new home: a contemporary style, but not out of place with the rest of the Capitol Hill neighborhood

GP House by OWN+ Felipe Caboclo Arquitetura

Located in the Yucatán Country Club Golf Club on the Yucatán peninsula, the GP House was born from a collaboration between friendly firms which have a very similar way of projecting.

Saint George House / Falken Reynolds Interiors

“The unique site of the 2,200 square foot (204 square metres) Saint George Street house inspired us to get creative with our design process and visually create more space,” says Chad Falkenberg, principal of Falken Reynolds.

Refurbishment and Extension of Neighbouring Houses in Islington, London

This project entailed the refurbishment and extension of neighbouring houses, the aim being to maximise the benefit of a single build with an agreed palette of materials, whilst offering variation between the two properties.

Recommended Stories