Elemental House in Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

Elemental House, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

Project: Elemental House in Vermont
Architects: Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design
Builder: Red House Building
Location: Fayston, Vermont
Year 2019
Photo Credits: Lindsay Selin Photography
Text by Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

On a rural hillside property encircled by fern-carpeted woods with breathtaking Green Mountain views, owners of the Elemental House envisioned a home enveloped by nature where they could relax with family and friends– a place uncomplicated, elegant, and beautiful, but rugged enough to withstand kids’ play and exploration. The owners married in Vermont and returned each summer, lengthening their stay as their family grew. After renting homes for years, they decided to build a house of their own so they could spend more time in the landscape they love.

Elemental House, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

An ambition to implement an architecture thoughtfully rooted in its place and incorporating energy efficiency and low-maintenance construction led to a reimagining of the vanishing Vermont farmhouse as a vernacular building for the modern world.

Elemental House, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

The house design and landscaping would be low-maintenance and unfussy. Our approach was to employ elemental architectural forms amid a lightly edited landscape. Two gabled volumes clad in charred and stained–almost black siding wedge into the slope while a third volume nestles uphill to form an L-shaped plan linked by a glassy entry node. We located the house at woods’ edge where the varied terrain, long views and dense woods could all be appreciated, and fully integrated into the design.

Elemental House, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

The house is both introverted and extraverted. It blends with the landscape to create a subdued, low-profiled entry and bedroom suite near the woods, but then boldly opens up on the downhill side to let in views and light at three levels.

 staircase, wood tread, metal railing / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

Inspired by the variability of the land and forest, we used shifting geometry to give the house a dynamic, natural feel. There is also a bit of mystery: by composing spaces with offset geometries to give hints of what’s beyond, the house doesn’t present itself all at once but is discovered through a series of vignettes and glimpses which open up to framed views. Spaces are practical and functional while also composed to create rich visual interest and unique, dramatic perspectives from each room.

Elemental House, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

Taking cues from “random patterns” and movement in the landscape, the palette throughout is textural and tonal highlighting the natural beauty and irregular imperfections of wood, handmade tile, blackened steel, concrete, and stone. Offset steel stairs connecting three levels are the interior centerpiece whose rod balusters similarly play on the beauty of imperfection—the irregular rail spacing evokes serene, gentle movement.

kitchen, wood cabinets, undermount sinks, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

kitchen, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

Elemental House, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

staircase / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

dining room, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

Elemental House, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

Elemental House, Vermont / Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

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